DIY Farmhouse Dining Table {My first woodworking project}

Hi there!  Hope you are enjoying your weekend. Lots of projects going on around here, but today I’m sharing my farmhouse dining table I built a little over a year ago (waaay before this blog!).  This was my very first woodworking project.  I did happen to snap a few photos of the process – sorry about the poor quality, these were taken with my phone!

I got this building plan – and the confidence to attempt it – from the amazing Ana White.   If you’ve never been to her site, she creates free and easy furniture building plans.  I love her plans because many of them are knock-offs of Pottery Barn and Restoration Hardware furniture!

Ana also released a really cute book last fall with some exclusive plans you can’t get on the website, plus a lot of tips and advice – its a great book for beginner builders.  You can check out her book on Amazon here.

The wood for building this table was around $100!  I think Pottery Barn was selling this table for around $1800 at the time.  Mine might not look identical, but for the cost differential, I’m a happy camper! DIY Farmhouse dining table from TheDomesticHeart.comThe main reason I am sharing this project is partially because its affordable – but mainly because I truly believe any one can build this table, or any of Ana’s furniture plans.

One reason I love DIY is because it allows you to create a beautiful and comfortable home you love, just to your taste, within your means.

For me, spending $1800 on a table just isn’t an option.  And I truly believe I enjoy this table immensely more than I would the PB one because of all the hard work I put into it. You can check out the free plans here.  Here’s a quick summary of how I did it. :) I cut all my wood with a miter saw, except for the legs, which I notched out with a table saw.  You don’t need anything too fancy a basic miter saw like this one will do the trick.  If you don’t have a table saw (I borrowed one), you can use a circular saw set to the depth specified in the plans. DIY Farmhouse dining table from TheDomesticHeart.comAttach the crossbars to the legs using wood screws as specified in plans.DIY Farmhouse dining table from I used a Kreg pocket hole jig to attach all the boards.  Let me tell you, those things are awesome.  Easy to use, makes joining a breeze, AND your projects will be mega sturdy!  The jig made it easy!  You can see the pocket holes below. DIY Farmhouse dining table from Laying out the table top boards to decide the layout.  I wanted to make sure I got some knotty spots on top to give it a more rustic look.DIY Farmhouse dining table from I joined the table top boards with pocket holes and then attached the table top to the table.DIY Farmhouse dining table from TheDomesticHeart.comblog pin it Breadboard ends attached with pocket holes to the table top.DIY Farmhouse dining table from I measured the bottom board but didn’t screw it on so I can remove it to move the table in and out of doorways when I move.  IMG_0893 For the stain I really wanted to create a natural-looking aged finish so I used the old steel wool and vinegar treatment.  Here’s how to do it:

  • A few days before you want to stain: Start by soaking some fine steel wool and white vinegar in a sealed jar.  Let it sit for a few days, shaking it periodically.  The vinegar will dissolve the steel wool into a dark/black solution.
  • Apply one coat of wood conditioner – I always do this before staining to ensure even coverage.  I like to put two coats on the raw ends of the wood.  This prevents them from soaking up too much stain and being darker than the rest of the wood.

DIY Farmhouse dining table from

  • Brew some very strong black tea and let it cool.  Then paint your wood with the black tea.  The pine I used is low in tannins so I did two coats of tea to add some more tannins to create a darker wood look.  You could do even more coats if you are looking for a darker stain.
  • After your tea stain has dried, brush on the steel wool vinegar mixture.  After a few minutes you will see the stain developing.

Here’s what it looks like after the steel wool solution application dries. DIY Farmhouse dining table from After the table was stained I applied 3 coats of satin Polycrilic.   The polycrilic actually took some of grays out of the wood that I was really loving, and lent a green tint to the finish that I don’t love, so I would recommend maybe using polyurethane, tung oil, or paste wax to seal the finish – lesson learned! I still love how it turned out though. :)DIY Farmhouse dining table from TheDomesticHeart.comDIY Farmhouse dining table from TheDomesticHeart.comDIY Farmhouse dining table from TheDomesticHeart.comI hope you feel inspired to start your own building project.  If I can do it, so can you!   I’ll have more pictures to show you when I share last year’s thanksgiving table!  I am also planning on building a farmhouse bed soon so stay tuned! :)

Update:  My finished DIY Pottery Barn-style headboard can be seen here.

For more DIY furniture inspiration you can check out my DIY Furniture board on Pinterest!

Follow Shelly@The Domestic Heart Blog's board DIY Furniture on Pinterest.


This post may contain affiliate links.  I receive a portion of purchases made after clicking these links, at no cost to you.  Thanks for supporting TDH!


  1. says

    Beautiful job! I can imagine many lively family dinners around a table like that. I found this post through the Inspire Me Please link party. If you get a chance to stop by my blog sometime, I’d love it! Hope you have a feast planned for that table sometime soon :)

  2. says

    Wow! This table is absolutely amazing. Love that price tag too. Thanks for sharing with us at Your Designs This Time!

    Erin & Emily

  3. says

    I can’t believe this is your first woodworking project – it looks amazing! We love the Kreg Jig too and can’t imagine not having it now. We just started building our own furniture about 6 months ago and it’s addicting! I can’t wait to see what else you create with it!
    Katie @ Upcycled Treasures recently posted…The Makers Link Party #32My Profile

  4. says

    Has anyone built this and run into a problem with seats at the end, not pushing in enough to actually eat at the table? I’m using this plan to build my own table to seat 10 in a couple of weeks and was curious if someone had any ideas on how to solve that problem? Thanks, love the plan!

    • says

      Hi there, I haven’t heard from anyone, but I do have that complaint personally. It doesn’t bother me too much because I only put chairs on the end when I have a lot of people over. It all boils down to the design of this particular table. If you think you’ll be using the end a lot you may want to choose a different plan. My other solution would be to increase the width of the breadboard ends so the chair would be farther back from he legs. But if you do that make sure to add a little extra support :). Hope this helps!

  5. says

    Fantastic project, and thanks for remembering to take photos as you’re going along. I normally get sucked into the work and forget!

  6. says

    Hi Shelly… A great project with some detailed pics, thanks! My wife would just love this farmhouse table. And I totally agree with you, why pay BIG bucks for something you can build yourself and not be made with junk material link particle board that’ll fall apart in a few years.

    Thanks for sharing and cheers!
    Ed Connors recently posted…How to Use a Scroll Saw: The Ultimate GuideMy Profile


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